Great Gobi B

Biosphere Reserve


Area 9'000 km2
Height
aprox. 1000 Meter above sea level

South-West Mongolia

read more

Takhi

Holy Animal of Mongolia


Population Great Gobi B SPA 235 Animals
back home since 1992

read more

Great Gobi B

Biosphere Reserve


Area 9'000 km2
Height
aprox. 1000 Meter above sea level

South-West Mongolia




read more

Great Gobi B

Biosphere Reserve


Area 9'000 km2
Height
aprox. 1000 Meter above sea level

South-West Mongolia



read more

Takhi

Holy Animal of Mongolia


Population Great Gobi B SPA 235 Animals
back home since 1992

read more

Takhi

Holy Animal of Mongolia


Population Great Gobi B SPA 235 Animals
back home since 1992


read more

Great Gobi B

Biosphere Reserve


Area 9'000 km2
Height
aprox. 1000 Meter above sea level

South-West Mongolia



read more

Takhi

Holy Animal of Mongolia


Population Great Gobi B SPA 235 Animals
back home since 1992

read more

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Population Growth

Successful despite several Setbacks

Population Growth since 1992



In 1992 reintroduction of the Takhi in the Great Gobi B Strictly Protected Area started near the place, where the last free-roaming Przewalski's Horse had been seen in the sixties of the last century. Until 2004 Takhis were transported form European zoos to Takhin tal on a regular basis.

Ever since the population developed mainly through offspring, intra-mongolian exchange-programmes and again newly transported zoo-animals since 2012 in order to increase genetic variability.

Despite some harsh climatic conditions which caused two severe setbacks, the population develops successfully. It has reached the number of 200 Takhi by the end of 2017!

Dzud - a Challenge for Humans and Wildlife

In winter 2000/01 and 2009/10 Takhis had to withstand severe weather conditions, which lead to a massive decrease in their population. 2009/10 the weather phenomenon known as dzud caused a dry summer in the Gobi B, followed by a winter with temperatures down to 40° Celsius and a compact snow cover measuring up to one metre. This had most serious consequences - only  48 takhi of the population of 137 takhi survived. Please read our report here.

From a scientific point of view, these winters lead to an intensive natural selection, which may have a positive effect in the future. However, such extreme weather conditions may not occur too often if the wild horses should survive in the Great Gobi B in the long term.